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River Seine

Seine River

Seine River

The Seine is a 776 km (482 mi)-long river and an important commercial waterway within the Paris Basin in the north of France. It rises at Saint-Seine near Dijon in northeastern France in the Langres plateau, flowing through Paris and into the English Channel at Le Havre (and Honfleur on the left bank). It is navigable by ocean-going vessels as far as Rouen, 120 km (75 mi) from the sea. Over 60% of its length, as far as Burgundy, is negotiable by commercial riverboats and nearly its whole length is available for recreational boating; excursion boats offer sightseeing tours of the Rive Droite and Rive Gauche within the city of Paris.

Seine River

Seine River

The name "Seine" comes from the Latin Sequana.Some have argued that Sicauna is cognate to the name of Saone River, though an argued relationship to the River Shannon in Ireland is unlikely, given the very different forms of the two; Gaelic an tSiona, dative Sionainn is rather from Prehistoric Irish Sinona. Another proposal has it that Sequana is the Latin version of Gaulish Issicauna Lower-Icauna, which would be the diminutive of Icauna, which was the Gaulish name of the Yonne River. Some believe the ancient Gauls considered the Seine to be a tributary of the Yonne, which indeed presents a greater average discharge than the Seine (the river flowing through Paris would be called Yonne if the standard rules of geography were applied).

Some identify the river Sikanos, origin (according to Thucydides) of the Sicanoi of Sikelia (Sicily), with the river Sequana (Seine).

According to Pierre-Yves Lambert, a specialist of the Gaulish language, Sequana retains QV, that is unusual in Gaulish, which is normally a P-Celtic language, but he compares with the month name EQVOS, read on the Coligny Calendar. The name of the Gaulish tribe Sequani derives from it.

Seine River

Seine River

The digram QV of Sequana could recover a whole syllable, that is to say [se-ku-wa-na], like ucuetis [u-ku-we-tis], but its meaning remains unknown.

There are 37 bridges within Paris and dozens more spanning the river outside the city. Examples in Paris include the Pont Louis-Philippe and Pont Neuf, the latter of which dates back to 1607. Outside the city, examples include the Pont de Normandie, one of the longest cable-stayed bridges in the world, which links Le Havre to Honfleur.

Taking a tour of Paris by boat is unparalleled as romantic experiences go. The city seems to be fanned out before you as you lazily drift down the Seine River or Paris' miles-long network of canals.

By taking a Paris boat tour, you can get a glimpse of some of the city's most mythical spots, enjoy a romantic dinner amid the soft glow of light on the water, or just sit back and revel in the fresh air and delicious floating in a scenic setting.

The best time to take a Paris boat tour is May through mid-September, when skies tend to be clearer and temperatures in Paris are generally warm. Fall and winter boat tours are still worthwhile, but keep in mind that wind from off the water and frequent rain can make sitting on the open-air deck less than desirable.

Seine River

Seine River

Ah, the Seine river. No other river in the world has been the subject of such poetic fussing, frantic picture-taking, and all-around adulation. Touring Paris via the Seine river is a great way to get familiar with many of the city's most stunning monuments, historical buildings, and ornate bridges, including:Notre Dame Cathedral,Eiffel Tower,Musee du Louvre,Musee d'Orsay,Assemblee Nationale (The National Assembly building),Hotel des Invalides,Pont Neuf (Paris' oldest bridge, dating to the 16th century),Pont Alexandre III (Art Nouveau bridge dating to 1896),Grand Palais (Belle Epoque building housing National Galleries)

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